A Survivor’s Ball, South Carolina

We’ve been through some sh*t together, we’ve been through some sh*t on our own. And last week, we celebrated again by reuniting.

Survivors are not born. They’re made. By struggle. By sadness. By fear. By learning and doing and enduring. I’m not afraid to appear narcissistic by saying that we’ve done them all and more and we’re still here and we plan on being here for a long time.

My beloved niece Amanda is in South Carolina, I’m in Massachusetts. She’s been on a journey of recovery from liver failure for a year and a half now, I’ve been on a Stage IV lung cancer road trip since last September. Neither of us are supposed to be where we are now. But we are. So there.

Traveling is one of the things that I am. I don’t just do it. Though I’ve been criticized for “how” I travel by some who think there’s some hard and fast rules to doing it bigger, better, and faster than me, the truth is that long before I got on an airplane or in a car, I was visiting national parks and monuments on by bedroom floor with a map open in front of my unknowing eyes.  I was discovering foreign lands through age-old National Geographic magazines open on the hall steps. To have the ability to travel taken away from me by cancer was a crushing blow. So imagine the double whammy of rushing down a runway on an American Airlines jetliner and seeing my brave and beautiful niece again all in one compact trip! If this sounds petty to you, maybe you’ll understand someday. I hope you do, but I also hope you don’t have to find out the way we did.

I never cared how I got to where I was going. How much my ticket cost as compared to someone else’s or how good my hotel room was, neither. It ain’t what you’re going to remember when you’re on your death bed. I care even less now. Just let me get there again.

Where was your last trip? Portugal? Good for you. Me, Hell and back. Beat that. But now I plan to make up for lost time, and my sentimental journey to South Carolina was the first step. In a near future blog I’ll talk about the fun stuff we did in more detail, like the trip to the gem mine and the working farm, both with gift shops, of course! But for today, I’ll just recount the more personal aspects of the trip.

Last fall, when I started on my cancer road trip, there was little hope for me to be sitting at my computer and typing this in an upright position, much less boarding an airplane and going places, for a hellishly long time, if ever again. This foray, and my story in general, is one of those miracles you read about in books about someone else. Sure, I was only gone for four days. And no, it wasn’t nearly enough time to celebrate life with Amanda. But in another way, it was the trip of a lifetime, to mark my existence truly beginning again, to set a precedent for getting my life back to the way it was not so long ago, and yet ages ago.

Valentine’s Day had already passed, but not really. February 14th, February 16th, what does it matter? They’re all the same when you aren’t supposed to be where you are, but you are anyway, by sheer force of luck, love, spirit, and whatever else got you there. Lots of presents were shared, tons of dog love, chocolate, and Smarties. How can you go wrong?

We ran around like teenagers and caught up on things. Pretended to be miners in Greenville. Went bowling because the movie choices sucked. Ate at a neat restaurant like the one we’d found in Boone, North Carolina last year. Ended the trip at our favorite China Garden eating seven different flavors of chicken and shrimp and drinking jasmine tea. It was there that I read the Survivor’s Ditty I wrote for us:

Once Upon a Time
Two cute chicks
Survived bad sh*t
Then went out
For Chinese Food
And when they were done
They lived and loved
Like there’s no tomorrow
THE END

Sigh. If only it were that simple.

Early the next morning, I had to leave her and come home to reality and appointments and killing cancer. For four whirlwind days it was like I was normal again. Wait, I am normal again. Maybe I was never not normal? Still trying to figure all this out.

It’s been a hell of a ride, and it ain’t over yet. As I sit and type, I still have treatment to endure. Fingers crossed that I’ve been through the worst of it. And you can bet that I’m hankering for that next trip down the runway. Guess where it will be to? If you guessed South Carolina, you’re right.

Making up for lost time.

My Supporting Cast

My beloved niece recently discovered my website and read many of my posts. What took her so long to find me is beside the point!  What really matters is that she did. She was especially interested in my autobiographical offerings.  So much so that she asked, “When are you going to write about your other family members?” To which I replied, “This is about me, not anyone else!” A few days later, when I wasn’t even thinking about it, I realized two things: that she wanted to be acknowledged as an important part of my life, and that she was absolutely right that I should be writing about someone besides myself! So many people have had their hands in shaping me. This post is for a few of them.

Being single and spending so much of life alone can make you feel like it’s all about you. But of course that’s not true, unless you have no family or friends! For a long time my sisters were both my family and my best friends. I often think that it took me so long to develop actual friendships because my sisters took care of all that for me. Then, once we started choosing paths that took us away from one another, a huge void was left that took many years to fill. Here’s a picture of us all together, in 2012, with the aforementioned niece in there, too:

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Front Row, Left to Right: Carol and Jeanne. Back Row, Left to Right: Amanda, Margo, Susan, Me, Marie

 

I’ve Got All My Sisters and Me

I’ve mentioned previously that I grew up with five sisters. I’m the youngest and got many great influences from them. I also had the benefit of spending time with them in different ways. Maybe that’s what made me a person of such diverse interests. Allow me to pay tribute to them, one by one.

My sister Marie gave me my first Beatles albums and taught me to love New York City and art museums. We’ve spent countless hours in the Big Apple and have seen many of the best exhibits. She has had my back without fault for decades. Through the years, my relationship with my oldest sister is the one that has endured the longest and strongest. Currently, she is one of two sisters that has not missed a single appointment of mine since I was diagnosed with cancer in October of 2019.

My sister Jeanne taught me to have compassion for people with disabilities. She has made me laugh so many times over the years, and has shown me the strength of the human spirit and the sheer will to live. Jeanne is a fighter who wants what she wants and won’t settle for anything less. We are soul sisters as well as blood sisters.

My sister Carol gave me the desire to travel and to be wild and free. I watched her lay down the example when I was young, and took mental notes so I could copy her when my turn came. Since September of 2019 she has been driving me here, there, and everywhere so that I can be the person I was before cancer tried to take over my life.

My sister Margo, who passed away from ovarian cancer in January of 2015, gave me the gift of music. While all my sisters influenced me in song, Margo was the one who turned me on to tunes from the 1970s. I consider that the foundation of the knowledge I used to pen my Girls of Glam Rock Series, and what cemented my love of the hair metal 80s and the grunge rock 90s. Every day that I’m stronger than cancer is not only lived for me, but for her, too, because she never had the chance to beat it.

My sister Susan gave me the gift of food and flowers. She is the real expert at cooking, baking, and making things grow and flourish, while I am just a humble follower. Several times a year she gives me delicious food to eat or something beautiful to grow. In fact, in 1984 she gave us the most precious bloom of all, my niece Amanda.

Nieces and Nephews

With all them sisters, you might think there would be tons of offspring! Not so. Three of us (Marie, Jeanne, and I) never had children. The other three took it easy. Carol and Susan had one each, Margo had twins and was done. I became an auntie to my nephew Ted, Carol’s son, when I was only five years old. Until then, I was the “baby.” As you can probably guess, I was really jealous of him for a few years! Mike and Eric, Margo’s fraternal twins, came along in 1981. Amanda was last, in 1984. We all spent a lot of time at the old homestead, Mom’s house.

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Mom loved her four grandchildren as much a her own kids. I’ve represented every family member mentioned in the surrounding pictures at least once.

Like families sometimes do, we eventually all went our own ways, sometimes too far away, not always happily. But if there’s a silver lining in hardship, it’s that it brings people together again. We’ve certainly had our share. And we’re holding it together.